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Much as it says on the tin, this podcast is about everyday ethics. We pose the kind of questions we enjoy debating; the kind you might wonder about in the course of regular life. It’s been flatteringly described as “Like listening to your mates argue in the pub, except they’re not rude to each other and they sound like they know what they’re talking about”. Somehow, we're now in the Top 2% of podcasts worldwide, so thanks, that's pretty cool. If you'd like to support the show, checkout our P ...
 
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Philosophy, Ideas, Critical Thinking, Ethics & Morality · The Creative Process

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Philosophy, Ideas, Critical Thinking, Ethics & Morality · The Creative Process

Philosophers, Writers, Educators, Creative Thinkers, Spiritual Leaders, Environmentalists & Bioethicists · Creative Process Original Series

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Philosophy episodes of the popular The Creative Process podcast. We speak to philosophers, writers, educators, spiritual leaders, environmentalists, bioethicists, artists & creative thinkers in other. disciplines To listen to ALL arts & education episodes of “The Creative Process · Arts, Culture & Society”, you’ll find our main podcast on Apple: tinyurl.com/thecreativepod, Spotify: tinyurl.com/thecreativespotify, or wherever you get your podcasts! Exploring the fascinating minds of creative ...
 
Artists of Morality is led by Atlanta native Jasmin Rhia. She promotes self-love and mental health awareness using the power of music. This radio show airs weekly and features Jasmin Rhia spinning dope beats while shredding the Violin. Enjoy! Checkout idratherberichnotfamous.com to keep in touch. Peace, love, and light.
 
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"One of the things that I've tried to do in my work is demonstrate the way that laws that don't seem to be directly related to social equality, to equality of opportunity, to racial justice in fact are and that it's only through also reforming these kind of systemic and institutionalized forms of discrimination that we could truly achieve an egalit…
 
REPLAY - in light of the queen's death and power transfering to Charles III, whilst we offer our condolensces it's more pertinent than ever to ask during these lavish ceremonies and high air-time events...should we even be maintaining our royal families? Here's a replay of our old episode, previously titled 'should we abolish the monarchy?' Previou…
 
Richard Thompson Ford is the George E. Osborne Professor of Law at Stanford Law School. His scholarship combines social criticism and legal analysis, and he writes for both popular readers and for academic and legal specialists. He's written for the Washington Post, San Francisco Chronicle, Christian Science Monitor, and other publications. He’s a …
 
"Human beings are not built for individual cognition. We're not built to master every detail about the world. Our minds are not made for storing a lot of details about the way that the world works because the world is just too complex for any one individual to master too much about it. Instead, what human beings are really designed for is collabora…
 
Philip Fernbach is an Associate Professor of Marketing and Co-Director of the Center for Research on Consumer Financial Decision Making at the University of Colorado, Boulder, Leeds School of Business. He’s published widely in the top journals in cognitive science, consumer research and marketing, and received the ACR Early Career Award for Contrib…
 
"I co-founded what has become EDGE for gender and intersectional equity back in 2009, and at that time workplace gender and intersectional equity were still very much seen as a societal issue rather than a business issue. Organizations were asking themselves if it's within their role to tackle these issues of equity, diversity, and inclusion in the…
 
Aniela Unguresan is Co-founder of EDGE Certification, the leading global assessment methodology and business certification standard for gender equality. Launched at the Annual Meeting of the World Economic Forum in 2011, EDGE Certification measures where organizations stand in terms of gender balance across their pipeline, pay equity, and effective…
 
The second in a two-parter where we discuss whether luxury goods are immoral. In a true return to form, this is a specific argument we have literally had over the office lunch table, originating from Ant's throwaway statement that he "doesn't get the point of jewellery" and "thinks it's ridiculously wasteful". In order to dissect whether luxuries a…
 
"We are the extreme animal. We're certainly, technologically speaking, there's no comparison to what humans can do among all the animals that make some tools, even though we should keep in mind that for close to 200,000 years, humans who were essentially identical to us had no tools that were more complicated than a bow and arrow. I think the most …
 
Carl Safina’s lyrical non-fiction writing explores how humans are changing the living world, and what the changes mean for non-human beings and for us all. His work has been recognized with MacArthur, Pew, and Guggenheim Fellowships, and his writing has won Orion, Lannan, and National Academies literary awards and the John Burroughs, James Beard, a…
 
"So I think this observation that there are sensory cues available that are, either completely different to what's available to us, including a magnetic compass sense that's accessible to some animals, but not us. And also within the sensory modalities that we have available, you find often that different animals, including bees use them completely…
 
Lars Chittka is professor of sensory and behavioral ecology at Queen Mary University of London, where he founded a new Research Centre for Psychology in 2008 and was its scientific director until 2012. He is the author of The Mind of a Bee and is the coeditor of Cognitive Ecology of Pollination. He studied Biology in Berlin and completed his PhD st…
 
"If all jobs could be done more cheaply and better by AI, then what would we do? It would be a world without work, and I think that initially that sounds kind of frightening. How would we earn an income? What would we do all day long? I think it's also a big opportunity to rethink what it means to be human and what gives meaning in our lives. I thi…
 
Nick Bostrom is a Swedish-born philosopher with a background in theoretical physics, computational neuroscience, logic, and artificial intelligence, as well as philosophy. He is the most-cited professional philosopher in the world under the age of 50. He is a Professor at Oxford University, where he heads the Future of Humanity Institute as its fou…
 
The first in a two-parter where we discuss whether luxury goods are immoral. In a true return to form, this is a specific argument we have literally had over the office lunch table, originating from Ant's throwaway statement that he "doesn't get the point of jewellery" and "thinks it's ridiculously wasteful". In order to dissect whether luxuries ar…
 
"I look at Stoicism as this operating system that is very accessible, that helps us to enhance our life, enhance positives in life, and diminish negatives in our life. So what happens to us when we are born: we are given this hardware and software. The software is kind of our operating system, and the operating system is fairly blank at first, and …
 
Vitaliy Katsenelson was born in Murmansk, Russia and immigrated to the United States with his family in 1991. He is the author of Soul in the Game, The Art of a Meaningful Life. He is the CEO of Denver-based value investment firm IMA. Vitaliy has also written two books on investing. Forbes Magazine called him “The New Benjamin Graham.” He’s written…
 
"Anytime that I am out in nature, I'm not always in the present. I oftentimes drift back into the past and different levels. And so, when I'm looking at a mountain in Montana, a big cliff, for example. I'm looking at the beauty of the cliff, but I'm also looking at what it represents, what that rock unit actually represents. And, in many cases, cli…
 
Jack Horner is a severely dyslexic, dinosaur paleontologist. He attended the University of Montana for 14 semesters without receiving a degree. He has since received two honorary doctorates of science and a plethora of awards including a MacArthur Fellowship. Jack was Curator and Regent’s Professor of Paleontology at Montana State University in Boz…
 
Designer, author, educator and artist Bruce Mau is a brilliantly creative optimist whose love of thorny problems led him to create a methodology for life-centered design. Across thirty years of design innovation, he’s collaborated with global brands and companies, leading organizations, heads of state, renowned artists and fellow optimists. Mau bec…
 
Designer, author, educator and artist Bruce Mau is a brilliantly creative optimist whose love of thorny problems led him to create a methodology for life-centered design. Across thirty years of design innovation, he’s collaborated with global brands and companies, leading organizations, heads of state, renowned artists and fellow optimists. Mau bec…
 
"We're kind of carrying on a tradition of the previous owners of our farm, a wonderful woman, her name is Linda. That's who we bought our farm from. And when she had the farm, she had Grassroots Farm, that was the name. And she was heavily into grassroots organizing, organizing around social issues and seeing the farm, the act of growing your own f…
 
John and Emily Beaton have created a multi-enterprise farming business in Northeastern Minnesota near Duluth and the shores of Lake Superior. They founded Fairhaven Farm with a spirit of community building, a focus on soil health, and a desire to see a thriving local food system. They sell starter plants each spring for home gardeners, grow food fo…
 
William B. Irvine is emeritus professor of philosophy at Wright State University in Dayton, Ohio, USA. He is the author of eight books that have been translated into more than twenty languages. His A Guide to the Good Life: The Ancient Art of Stoic Joy played a key role in the Stoic renaissance that has taken place in recent years. His subsequent T…
 
"I stumbled across Stoic philosophy and thought it was just wonderful stuff. So, I'd had the exact wrong idea of what it was. Most people do because if they look it up in the dictionary, a Stoic is this glum individual who simply suppresses all emotions, but that isn't what the Stoics were at all. They came up with these really brilliant psychologi…
 
"It can be very difficult. When we say seven generations, our generations are longer - from grandparent to grandparent - it's not the Western idea of one generation. So it's even longer than most people would know, and the thing is it does take practice. It does take true intention, not only individually, but societal, community intention. It has t…
 
Victor A. Lopez-Carmen is a Dakota and Yaqui writer, health advocate, and student at Harvard Medical School. He is cofounder of the Ohiyesa Premedical Program at the Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH), which supports Indigenous community and tribal college students to pursue healthcare education. He also founded Translations for our Nations, a gran…
 
"For the 30 years, maybe 40 years for some, the dominant view of many cognoscientists, is that consciousness is something that brains create. So most of the processes in our brains are proceeding without any conscious content, so that they're unconscious processes, but a small amount of our brain processes are somehow experiences. And the standard …
 
Donald D. Hoffman is a Professor of Cognitive Sciences at the University of California, Irvine. He is the author of The case against reality: Why evolution hid the truth from our eyes. His research on perception, evolution, and consciousness received the Troland Award of the US National Academy of Sciences, the Distinguished Scientific Award for Ea…
 
“This is an intergenerational problem. The response to climate change relates very much to value systems. And one of the questions people ask, or should ask is: How much do you value the future generations? How much do you value the world that you're leaving your children and your grandchildren? And what kind of a climate you're leaving them with? …
 
Kevin Trenberth is a Distinguished Scholar at the National Center of Atmospheric Research (NCAR) in Boulder and an Honorary Academic in the Department of Physics, Auckland University in Auckland, New Zealand. From New Zealand, he obtained his Sc. D. in meteorology in 1972 from Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He was a lead author of the 1995,…
 
“I also would like to tell you how inspired I was in my childhood by all the big explorers that I met, astronauts of the early American Space Program, pioneers in aviation, pioneers in environment, in underwater exploration. And all these people showed me that it is wonderful to embrace the unknown, to do things that nobody thinks is possible, to t…
 
Psychiatrist, aviator and explorer, Bertrand Piccard made history in 1999 by accomplishing the first ever non-stop round-the-world balloon flight, and a number of years later the first round-the-world solar-powered flight. Piccard has dedicated his life to demonstrating sustainable development opportunities. He is Founder and Chairman of the Solar …
 
The third in our series on euthanasia and assisted suicide - later named with the much more provocative title, 'When is it ok to put down a human being?'. In this series we explore how much control we (and other people) should have over our own death. This is primarily focused on circumstances where death is near and inevitable, and life/treatment …
 
The second in our series on euthanasia and assisted suicide - later named with the much more provocative title, 'When is it ok to put down a human being?'. In this series we explore how much control we (and other people) should have over our own death. This is primarily focused on circumstances where death is near and inevitable, and life/treatment…
 
The first in our series on euthanasia and assisted suicide - later named with the much more provocative title, 'when is it ok to put down a human being?'. In this series we explore how much control we (and other people) should have over our own death. This is primarily focused on circumstances where death is near and inevitable, and life/treatment …
 
"If the only place that science or biology students get exposed to ethics is in the philosophy department, then they don't think of it as being a part of their discipline. Whereas if their own faculty that are teaching them their discipline are also integrating ethics, then the idea would be they start to realize that, 'Wait, this is important to m…
 
Jonathan Newman is an ecologist who studies plant–animal interactions in the context of species invasions and climatic change. He is the lead author of two books: Climate Change Biology, and Defending Biodiversity: Environmental Science and Ethics, and co-editor of Grasslands and Climate Change. He is the author of more than 100 other scientific pu…
 
“In terms of human wealth and general quality of life as measured in numerical terms, the costs for that are also manifest and have largely been externalized, if not necessarily into the environment, where they often are, they're also externalized into the future, which is to say, yes, there is this huge surge in human population and relative wealt…
 
Roy Scranton, is the award-winning author of five books, including Learning to Die in the Anthropocene: Reflections on the End of a Civilization, Total Mobilization: World War II and American Literature, and We’re Doomed. Now What? He has written for the NYTimes, Rolling Stone, The Nation, and other publications. He was selected for the 2015 Best A…
 
Third in our series (of 3 episodes) exploring the intersection of morality and public policy; generally of the form 'should X be made legal?'. We'll be exploring both the ethical arguments and some of the high level data around key policy decisions surrounding commonly banned substances and activities. A core introductory theme (and one that's cons…
 
“I think that is often what tourism is starting to move towards. Is this existential authentic? And what that means is that you're not even really looking to meet expectations or validate that the thing in front of you is what it says it is. You are trying to recreate who you think you should be in a time that is disconnected from your usual life. …
 
David A. Banks is the Director of Globalization Studies at the University at Albany, SUNY and the author of the forthcoming book The City Authentic: How the Attention Economy Builds Urban America published by University of California Press. He is also a delegate to the Troy Area Labor Council and the co-host of the podcast Ironweeds. “I think that …
 
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