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Join The New Yorker’s writers and editors for reporting, insight, and analysis of the most pressing political issues of our time. On Mondays, David Remnick, the editor of The New Yorker, presents conversations and feature stories about current events. On Wednesdays, the senior editor Tyler Foggatt goes deep on a consequential political story via far-reaching interviews with staff writers and outside experts. And, on Fridays, the staff writers Susan B. Glasser, Jane Mayer, and Evan Osnos disc ...
 
RingTales brings the world famous cartoons of The New Yorker to fully animated life. They're short. They're smart. They're wickedly funny. They feature the hysterical work of renowned cartoon artists such as Sam Gross, Bob Mankoff and Roz Chast. Enjoy a bite-sized gift of comic comedy three times a week. Animation that's addictive. You can't watch just one.
 
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All week, Washington, D.C., has been talking about Donald Trump’s dinner with Nick Fuentes, a notorious white supremacist and Holocaust denier. A wave of prominent Republicans have repudiated the dinner and anti-Semitism, including Senators Mitch McConnell and Mitt Romney. Trump’s former Vice-President, Mike Pence, condemned the meeting as well, wi…
 
J. Michael Luttig is a retired judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals and a prominent legal mind in conservative circles, close with figures including Clarence Thomas and William Barr. On January 5, 2020, he got a call from Vice-President Mike Pence’s then-lawyer asking Luttig to publicly back Pence’s decision not to attempt to overturn the election th…
 
Danielle Dutton reads her story “My Wonderful Description of Flowers,” which appeared in the December 5, 2022, issue of the magazine. Dutton is the co-founder of Dorothy, a publishing project, and the author of three books of fiction, including the novel “Margaret the First.” A new book, “Prairie, Dresses, Art, Other,” will be published in 2024.…
 
Louise Erdrich reads her story “The Hollow Children,” which appeared in the November 28, 2022, issue of the magazine. Erdrich is the author of more than a dozen works of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry, most recently “The Sentence” and “The Night Watchman,” which won the Pulitzer Prize in 2021.Kirjoittanut WNYC Studios and The New Yorker
 
Anger over China’s “Zero-COVID” policy erupted in protests this week. It’s a startling and nearly unheard-of challenge to President Xi’s power, a short time after he secured a third term in office. The anger over Zero COVID is unique, the staff writer Jiayang Fan tells the host Tyler Foggatt, because it has united disparate groups across China that…
 
It's National Stay at Home Because You're Well Day! Celebrate National Mousse Day and National Mason Jar Day and let's not forget National Computer Security Day! This week the pair chat about Ev's continuing Spanish adventures, All the news from Pasquale's family, Cruise passengers bobbing in the Gulf of Mexico for more than twenty hours! Like us A…
 
The veteran stage and screen actress Christine Baranski first became a household name thanks to her Emmy-winning turn on the nineties sitcom “Cybill,” and her Tony-award winning work on Broadway. But “The Good Fight” took her to another level. As Diane Lockhart, a Chicago attorney and diehard liberal, Baranski captured the tensions of the political…
 
Quinta Brunson made a name for herself as a master of meme comedy and is a self-described “child of the Internet,” yet her ABC mockumentary series “Abbott Elementary” is an unabashed throwback to the sitcoms of her youth. Doreen St. Félix talked with Brunson at the 2022 New Yorker Festival about her influences and the everyday comedy of the workpla…
 
Many of the most important and powerful people in Washington, D.C., are on the older side. Joe Biden turned eighty last week. Mitch McConnell is also eighty. Nancy Pelosi, who recently stepped away from a leadership position in her party, is eighty-two. All three of these leaders have delivered big victories for their respective parties. But there …
 
Supposedly, things in Hollywood have been changing for women and people of color. After the #MeToo, #OscarsSoWhite, and Black Lives Matter movements, leaders in the entertainment industry promised a lot: new kinds of stories were going to be told, by newly diverse writers, showrunners, and casts. In short, Hollywood’s long history of sexism and dis…
 
This week, Evelyn is in Spain and the co-hosts chat about those Spanish adventures; Toledo and Marbella. And, Pasquale shares his experience as an Elmo balloon handler at the Stamford Thanksgiving Parade - Clowns, clowns and more clowns! The pair also opine about this and that. Like us AND SHARE on https://www.facebook.com/2newyorkers1000opinions/a…
 
In the lead-up to this year’s midterm elections, many pundits expected Republicans to make significant gains among Latino voters, further eroding a base of support that Democrats have arguably taken for granted for decades. “What happened instead, as you know, is a more complicated story,” the contributing writer Stephania Taladrid says, one that b…
 
No self-respecting sports fan is naïve about the role that money plays in pro sports. But, by any standard, the greed and cynicism behind the World Cup are extraordinary. The cloud of scandal surrounding FIFA, the international soccer organization, has led to indictments and arrests on charges of wire fraud, racketeering, and money laundering aroun…
 
Five years ago, reporting on the film producer Harvey Weinstein’s history of assault and misconduct opened the floodgates of the national reckoning with gender and power known as #MeToo. Three New Yorker critics—Alexandra Schwartz, Naomi Fry, and Vinson Cunningham—recently gathered to assess #MeToo’s impact on the culture more broadly. They discuss…
 
No self-respecting sports fan is naïve about the role that money plays in pro sports. But, by any standard, the greed and cynicism behind the World Cup are extraordinary. The cloud of scandal surrounding FIFA, the international soccer organization, has led to indictments and arrests on charges of wire fraud, racketeering, and money laundering aroun…
 
Donald Trump announced his third bid for the White House this week. But the landscape is very different from when he glided down the Trump Tower escalator in 2015. He has lost the popular vote twice. He has been impeached twice. He is facing numerous criminal investigations, including for his role in trying to overturn the 2020 election. Many of hi…
 
​​Nearly four hundred election deniers ran in the midterms, and not only did the highest-profile among them lose their races, they even willingly conceded. Does this mean that Donald Trump’s “Stop the Steal” movement has run out of political steam? Or is it merely shapeshifting for a new era? Rachel Monroe, who has been reporting from conspiracy-ri…
 
This week the pair chat about how busy Pasquale always is, and Ev's upcoming trip to Spain, more celebrity nonsense, and Pasquale meets the famous Cher impersonator , Steven Andrade! Like us AND SHARE on https://www.facebook.com/2newyorkers1000opinions/and follow us on Twitter and Instagram --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/2newyorkers…
 
Today we’re unveiling The Political Scene, an expanded and reimagined version of our flagship politics podcast, showcasing the great political journalism of The New Yorker. We’re thrilled to announce four new hosts and a new weekly show. Tyler Foggatt, a senior editor at the magazine, is now the permanent host of in-depth conversations about the mo…
 
The poet Safia Elhillo first found her voice onstage, performing in youth poetry slams in Washington, D.C., where she grew up, the child of Sudanese immigrants. She published her first collection in 2017, and in 2021 her novel in verse, “Home Is Not a Country,” was long-listed for the National Book Award. She’s now out with a new collection, “Girls…
 
Rudolf Vrba was sent to Auschwitz at the age of seventeen, and, because he was young and in good health, he was not killed immediately but put to labor in the camp. Vrba (originally named Walter Rosenberg) quickly discovered that the scale of the killing was greater than anyone on the outside knew or could imagine, and Jewish communities were being…
 
Rudolf Vrba was sent to Auschwitz at the age of seventeen, and, because he was young and in good health, he was not killed immediately but put to labor in the camp. Vrba (originally named Walter Rosenberg) quickly discovered that the scale of the killing was greater than anyone on the outside knew or could imagine, and Jewish communities were being…
 
On Tuesday, as results from the midterms came in, Democrats were pleased to see that a predicted red wave had not come to pass. That is, with one exception: in the bright blue state of New York. So far, Republicans have taken ten of New York’s twenty-six congressional districts, flipping four seats away from Democrats. The significance of this numb…
 
This week the pair chat about Evelyn's recent trip to New Orleans, How busy Mr. Cardone always is, Cher's recent marriage to a much younger man, How this podcast and these hosts did NOT make it on the list of the 40 most Powerful In Podcasting. =( Pasquale asks Evelyn to conduct a field study on how many Florida men wear gold chains.(??!!) --- Send…
 
The first season of “The White Lotus” won ten Emmy Awards and was a critics’ favorite. A dark satire of the privileged, the show chronicled the visit to a luxurious Hawaiian resort of a tech mogul and her family, a pair of newlyweds, and a single woman—all having the worst time of their lives—while the hotel manager goes off the wagon in a way both…
 
Until recently, the Reverend Russell Moore held a leading position—president of the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission—in the Southern Baptist Convention, the largest Protestant denomination in the country. He left the S.B.C. last year after criticizing the Church’s response to scandals around sexual abuse and ongoing racism, which Moore descr…
 
Russell Moore, a prominent figure in the Southern Baptist Convention, resigned over the church’s response to racism—which Moore considers a sin—and documented sexual abuse allegations. The theologian sits down with David Remnick to reflect on the intersection of Christianity and American politics. “Jesus always refused to have his gospel used as a …
 
This week, the Supreme Court heard two cases—against Harvard and U.N.C.—that may very well bring about the end of affirmative action at American colleges and universities. The practice rests on the Fourteenth Amendment: equal protection under the law. But the conservative John Roberts court is reëvaluating what “equal protection” really means, rais…
 
This week the pair chit chat about Evelyn's trip to New Orleans, Pasquale is busy as ever, Ben and JLo are having marital issues - and Evelyn says "I told you so", Pasquale stumps Evelyn-Google again. Like us AND SHARE on https://www.facebook.com/2newyorkers1000opinions/and follow us on Twitter and Instagram --- This episode is sponsored by · Ancho…
 
Jamil Jan Kochai joins Deborah Treisman to read and discuss “All Will Be Well,” by Yiyun Li, which was published in The New Yorker in 2019. Kochai is the author of two books, the novel “99 Nights in Logar,” which was a finalist for the PEN/Hemingway Award, and the story collection “The Haunting of Hajji Hotak,” which is a finalist for the National …
 
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