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T� Falado provides Brazilian Portuguese pronunciation lessons for speakers of Spanish. Podcasts illustrate pronunciation differences between Spanish and Portuguese and present scenarios showing cultural differences between the U.S. and Brazil. T� Falado is part of the Brazilpod project and is produced at the College of Liberal Arts, University of Texas at Austin. Website URL: http://coerll.utexas.edu/brazilpod/tafalado/
 
This is Volume 1 of William Mann’s “Esperanto Self-Taught with Phonetic Pronunciation”. It is part of a series of Self-Taught books written by various authors that include vocabularies of common words, elementary grammars and conversational phrases. The present volume contains thirty-seven vocabularies of common Esperanto words. If you want to learn Esperanto words or improve your Esperanto vocabulary, this volume may be of use to you. Mann writes, in the preface, that his work “supplies ver ...
 
Zapp! English Vocabulary and Pronunciation is based on *Real* unscripted English conversations featuring speakers with different accents. Each podcast also contains interactive audio classes with a teacher to work on your vocabulary and pronunciation. Every podcast comes with an e-book available on Zappenglish.com. The eBook includes the complete conversation and class transcripts, vocabulary lists, and additional practice exercises and answers only available in the eBooks. We charge a small ...
 
Study English conversation skills with one of YouTube's most popular English as a Second (or third!) Language teachers, Rachel of Rachel's English. Most beneficial for intermediate to advanced students, Rachel's specialty is the nuance and musicality of spoken English. Learn about English stress, sounds, and melodies, in addition to American slang, idioms, phrasal verbs, vocabulary, common phrases, culture, and more! Each episode is a CONVERSATION, so join the conversation now and learn how ...
 
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Here's part 2 of my version of Goldilocks and the Three Bears. Again I'll read the text two times and then break it into sentences or groups of sentences so you can practice repeating. Meanwhile the bear family was sitting down to breakfast. Baby Bear tasted his porridge. “Too hot!” he exclaimed. Mama Bear looked at the steam coming up from her por…
 
You're probably familiar with the story of Goldilocks and the Three Bears. Here's part one of my version. I'll read the beginning two times and then break it into sentences or groups of sentences so you can practice repeating. Have fun! If you need a translation, here's the link to DeepL. Once upon a time there was a little girl named Goldilocks. S…
 
I took Ollie for a walk in the dark earlier this evening. Some of our neighbors have Halloween displays in their yards. I learned that Ollie does NOT like zombies in the dark. Several times seeing human-like figures he started to growl and once I thought he was going to attack one of the zombies. It's good that he wants to protect me... But now bac…
 
I've been very busy with grandkids, with work (even though I'm 90% retired from our family business), and with getting ready for winter which will arrive soon enough. Our house is in a wooded area and the leaves are changing color and falling like rain every time the wind blows. But it's time for another podcast, and I have good news and bad news. …
 
When you say you "used to" do something (or "used to" be something), it means you did it (or "were" it) for a while in the past. For example: "In the past, Mary was a nurse, but now she's a doctor." Another way to say this is: "Mary used to be a nurse, but now she's a doctor." Let's practice: 1.I used to love coffee but now I prefer tea. 2.I used t…
 
In the past progressive tense, we talk about doing something when something else occurs. For example: "I was eating dinner when the President called me." The President's call interrupts the first action. 1. I was watching TV when the power failed. 2. I was watching TV when the lights went out. 3. I was listening to the radio when the electricity fa…
 
Here’s part three, and the last part, of phrasal verbs based on the verb to come. 51. Come in = arrive Look, there’s Susan! Her train must have come in early. 52. Come in = enter Please come in and make yourselves comfortable. 53. Come from = Have as one’s birth place Peter comes from Russia and Anna comes from Germany. 54. Come for = Search for in…
 
More practice with phrasal forms of the verb to come. 21. Come round = visit She told her mother she’d come round and visit after work. 22. Come round = recover consciousness After the boxer was knocked out, it took a while for him to come round. 23. Come round = change one’s opinion to the generally accepted one It took him a year to come round an…
 
In this podcast you'll get to practice with phrasal forms of the verb to come. There are a lot of them so let's get started. 1. Come with = come along John and I are going to see a movie tonight. Do you want to come with us? 2. Come upon = find While exploring the woods near our house, we came upon a wooden chest full of rubies and emeralds. Pirate…
 
This podcast has two parts. In the first part there are ten sentences. Each sentence has an error in it, a mistake. See if you can find the error. In the second part of the podcast the errors are corrected and you will have a chance to listen and repeat the corrected sentences. Here’s an example: Mr. Johnson drived his car to work yesterday. Did yo…
 
It's been a while since my last podcast. I've been busy! Today, for example, I was cutting some weeds in our back yard and I got stung twice by some sort of stinging insects. Yellow jackets, I think, although I'm not sure. That's the sort of adventure I could live without! I repaired the gear shifter on our snowblower yesterday, and today I replace…
 
The most common vowel sound in English is called "schwa". It is the sound we commonly use in unaccented syllables. In the international phonetic alphabet (IPA), the schwa sound is written with an upside down letter 'e' like this: /ə/ I think of it as being an 'uh' sound. By coincidence this sound is in the word "syllables": / ˈsɪləbəlz/ - in this w…
 
In this podcast you'll get more practice with the verb "to do". Grammar note: In English you cannot ask "Speak you French?" or "Have you a dog?" This form is possible in Spanish and French and German, to name three examples, but it is NOT correct in English. In English we use the verb "to do" to ask these questions. 1. Do you like pizza? I LOVE piz…
 
For fun: Here's a reading of a picture book that is perfect for beginners: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JeJxXeG-bLI In this podcast we'll introduce the days of the week, a few more verbs, and some numbers. 1. Monday is the first day of the work week. 2. Tuesday comes after Monday. 3. Wednesday comes after Tuesday. 4. Thursday follows Wednesday. …
 
The verb "to do" is very important and very useful. In this podcast we will ask the question: What are you doing? What is he doing? etc. and use the answers to introduce some common verbs. 1. What are you doing? I'm talking to my girlfriend. 2. What are you doing? I'm finishing my homework. 3. What are you doing? I'm taking a test. 4. What are you …
 
Part One: phrasal verbs with leave 1. Please put the leftovers in the frig when you finish eating. If you leave them out, they’ll go bad. [to leave out = not put away] [frig = refrigerator. “To go bad” = to spoil.”] 2. The pirates left me behind on a desert island with no food or water. Fortunately I was spotted by a passing helicopter and rescued.…
 
Let’s do some more practice with the verb “to be”, and with contractions. Remember: Listen, listen, listen! 1. We write: “I am hungry,” but we say: “I’m hungry.” [“I’m” is a contraction of “I am”] 2. He’s thirsty. [He is —> he’s] 3. She’s happy. [She is —> she’s] 4. You’re late! [You are —> you’re] 5. We’re tired. [We are —> we’re] 6. They’re at th…
 
If you are a total beginner, my advice is simple. Listen and listen and listen. The more you listen, the better your pronunciation and accent will be later. But listening comes first. And a warning: English spelling is NOT phonetic. If you try to read English before you listen, you will create problems for yourself. You will pronounce words incorre…
 
So many prepositions, so little time. Today let’s practice sentences with ON and IN. Nobody can live in New York on ten dollars a day. The generals planned their attack on Berlin. Did you see that new science fiction show on television? Not yet. Is it on Netflix too? There are a lot of good science podcasts on the BBC. If the company pays for our h…
 
In this conversation a husband and wife are discussing a problem caused by their cat. Listen three times without reading the text below to see how much you understand. Then look at the notes for explanations of the vocabulary. There are also a few slang expressions in this conversation. After the third repetition I'll break the conversation up into…
 
In this podcast you'll practice with the words much and many, and when to use each one. The rules are simple: If you can count something, use many. For example: How many children does Mrs. Johnson have? Three, I think. Two boys and a girl. If it is non-countable, like water, sand, milk, etc., use much. For example: There isn't much gas left in the …
 
Here is some practice with ‘some’ and ‘any’. Note that ‘some’ is in positive statements and ‘any’ is in negative ones, and also usually in questions. I'll read all the sentences first. Just listen. Then I'll put in repeats. Listen to those and, as you feel comfortable, repeat along with me. Here we go. Lucky Bob has some friends. I don’t have any f…
 
The “aw” sound in English is usually written with either “aw” or “au”. Here are two examples: “August” — his birthday is in August. “Squawk” — the ducks quacked and the chickens squawked. Let’s practice. I like to paint. Mary likes to draw. The cat was drinking milk from a saucer. Michael is studying law at the university. When you cut wood with a …
 
This is a lesson about the pronunciation of some plurals in English, with a few numbers thrown in as a bonus. Listen: I have one cat. Mary has two cats. John only has one horse. I'm rich: I have (23) twenty-three horses. Sam has one cow. Sally has three cows. Listen to the pronunciation of the words as they go from singular to plural: cat — cats ho…
 
We use the preposition "for" in many ways. Here are another ten examples to listen to and practice with. Have fun! 1. Do you want to go out for lunch? 2. He folded a towel and used it for a pillow. 3. She ran for the door when people started fighting. 4. For what it's worth, I thought the acting in that movie was terrible. 5. I voted for Trump—just…
 
Sometimes people will describe something that happened in the past using the present tense. For example, let's say I see a car accident on my way to work. After work I want to tell my wife what I saw, but instead of using the past tense, I use the present tense. This makes the story seem more immediate and alive. Listen: So I'm on my way to work wh…
 
Let's continue our study of prepositions. (I'm confident we'll finish before my hundredth birthday.) In this lesson we'll work with the very useful preposition "at". I'll meet you at Sally's house. It's at the corner of Pine Street and Sixth Avenue. She is always at home at night. His dog growled at me. I barked back at him and he was so surprised …
 
In this lesson we'll practice some sentences with the preposition "from". He got a phone call last night from his sister. She left this morning from New York. My first class in the morning goes from 9am to 10am. On a scale from 1 to 10, with 1 being the lowest score, how would you rate your English professor? She told us the history of the Aztecs f…
 
If I sound like I have a cold, I do. The best way to learn English prepositions is to memorize lots of sentences which include them. After a while, you'll develop an "ear" for what sounds correct and what sounds wrong. Do NOT try to translate. What might be correct in Spanish or French or another language could easily be wrong in English. 1. Sorry,…
 
We learn to compare things at an early age. "She got a bigger piece of cake than me!" "He's taller than I am." "She's prettier than her sister." And sometimes we call things out as being the "top dog" [the best]: "Charles is the smartest student in his math class." "Rudy is the best basketball player in the school." One pronunciation note: remember…
 
There are many expressions and idioms in English that use the word "chance". In this podcast I'll give you a chance to practice some of them. Let's begin. 1. I'm going to quit my current job and take a chance on that new job I was offered. [ = to try my luck at the new job.] 2. Can you by any chance lend me ten dollars? [ = perhaps] 3. Fat chance o…
 
(www.deepL.com — a good website if you need to translate something.) There is a saying in English: A little knowledge is a dangerous thing. This is certainly true for language students. If you know absolutely no English and someone starts to talk to you, you smile and shrug and say—in your own language—'Sorry, I don't speak English'. But if you kno…
 
I have never studied journalism but I vaguely remember one of my high school English teachers telling us that any well-constructed newspaper story would answer basic questions like these: What happened? When did it happen? Where did it happen? Who was involved? How or why did it happen? And so forth. For example, if there was a fire in somebody's k…
 
Learning the forms of the conditional in English is not especially easy. In this podcast I'll share some sentences that give you a chance to practice the conditional. And because I personally am a big fan of repetition in language learning, I've repeated each sentence fifteen times. My suggestion is to listen to everything one or more times, and th…
 
How to say hello in Russian? Here are some basic Russian greetings: ЗДРАВСТВУЙТЕ – hello ПРИВЕТ – hi ДОБРОЕ УТРО – good morning ДОБРЫЙ ДЕНЬ – good afternoon ДОБРЫЙ ВЕЧЕР – good evening Learn Russian with me here – https://realrussiancourses.com
 
Here are some more tongue twisters for your entertainment. They're supposed to be for children who are native English speakers. But don't feel discouraged if you find some of them difficult. I find some of them difficult, especially the last one. Have fun! 1. I scream, you scream, we all scream for ice cream. 2. Sheep should sleep in a shed. 3. A b…
 
Most of my podcasts are at least a little bit silly but this one is completely silly. It contains two tongue twisters which exist only to make you laugh at yourself and perhaps to help you with English pronunciation. The first one is: Rubber baby buggy bumpers which you are to repeat three times as quickly as possible. The second one is: How much w…
 
Let's start with a vowel warmup. Repeat each word after me. [pure vowel sounds] Heat heat Hot hot Hut hut Hoot hoot Hit hit Hurt hurt Hood hood Head head Haughty haughty Hand hand [dipthongs] Hay hay Rhyme rhyme Round round Boys boys Gold gold Hot dang! You just repeated all the vowels and diphthongs, which are the [the sounds in] words like hay, s…
 
In this podcast you'll get a chance to practice with some expressions which are based on the verb "to get". And you will get a lot of mileage out of the verb to get. There are probably, maybe 150 different expressions, phrasal verbs, different things that use "get"—I don't even know how many, but a lot. So, let's get to work! 1. I don't get it. The…
 
I was thinking about cats today. And then I decided it would be fun to do a little podcast about cats. Or about the word "cat" anyway. Let's start with the sound: CAT /æ/ cat cat cat I have a cat. I have a cat. [æ = the phonetic symbol for this sound] Cat rhymes with flat. In England some people live in "flats" which in the USA we call apartments. …
 
Here are some sentences to listen to. I hope you'll like what you hear. The verbs to listen and to hear can cause confusion. So here's a quick lesson, a mini-lesson, with examples of each. We'll start with the verb to listen. Part One: the verb to listen 1 I will listen more carefully next time. I'll listen more carefully next time. 2 Please listen…
 
Say or tell: two verbs instead of one. Listen to these examples: My father says I should study more. My father told me to study more. Here’s another example. Uncle Fred said he was a great inventor. Uncle Fred told me he was a great inventor. In this lesson I will give you plenty of example sentences. Some contain ‘say’ and some contain ‘tell’ and …
 
In this lesson we'll practice the difference between /s/ and /sh/ sounds as in "sip" compared to "ship", and the final sounds /k/ and /g/ as in "luck" and "lug". Part One: /s/ vs. /sh/ 1) see --she 2) seat -- sheet 3) sock--shock 4) save--shave 5) gas--gash 6) single--shingle 7) so--show 8) sore--shore 9) sort--short 10) fist--fished 11) plus--plus…
 
Reminder: Read the text below for comprehension. Then put it away and LISTEN to the podcast. Give your eyes a rest and exercise your ears. Do you know the expression "To go down the drain"? Literally it's what happens when you go to the sink and pour something down the drain. The hole at the bottom of the sink is the drain. Or you wash some dishes …
 
This episode is an experiment. I'm not going to provide any text. Like a baby learning its first language, I just want you to listen and play with what you hear. Above all, remember that babies don't waste a second worrying about pronunciation, grammar, or any other grown-up stuff. They just listen and let their amazing brains do all the heavy lift…
 
The concept of hardness and softness is crucial in mastering your Russian pronunciation. Here are the words I used today: МАТЬ – МЯТЬ УГОЛ – УГОЛЬ МАТ – МАТЬ Try to practice with English 'moot' and 'mute' or 'lip' and 'leap'. Also, pay attention to he difference between И and Ы. Learn Russian with me here – https://realrussiancourses.com…
 
In this lesson we will practice two more vowel sounds. First /ʊ/, the sound in words like good stood book And then the sound /u:/ in words like moon boot soon Part One: Listen to the following sentences with the /ʊ/ sound: That’s a good cookbook. I would like to buy a wool jacket. Take a look at this hook. Please put the wood over there. The soldie…
 
This lesson is the first in a series on American English vowel sounds. It is primarily intended for Spanish speakers but won't harm anyone else. I promise! Today's sounds are the [i] sound in fit, sit, or bit, and the [ee] sound in feet, seat, and beat. Part One: Let's start with a few sentences which include both sounds. I'll read each sentence tw…
 
In this podcast we'll practice with the "th" sounds in English. This is the sound you hear in the word "the" and the word "think". The "th" in "the" is voiced which means your vocal cords vibrate when you make the sound. In "think" the "th" sound is unvoiced--the vocal cords do not vibrate. Part One of this lesson is a listening exercise. I wrote a…
 
If you are a native speaker of French and have studied English, then you have probably run into the /h/ problem. This sound, which Americans make when we say "Hello" and "How are you" and "Ha ha ha", does not exist in French. This makes two problems for French speakers. 1) Problem one: The sound is dropped. So I say Hello and the French speaker say…
 
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