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Seriously Social

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Seriously Social

Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia

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Your world, explained. Exploring who we are, how we got here and where we are going. Australia’s top social scientists in conversation with journalist Ginger Gorman. Seriously interesting. Seriously insightful. Seriously social. Brought to you by the Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia.
 
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Discover the New Releases Audiobooks in Nonfiction, Social Sciences

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Discover the New Releases Audiobooks in Nonfiction, Social Sciences

You Get 1 Full Audiobook Free By Starting a 30-Day Free Trial. Go to *** hotaudiobook.com/free ***

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Download a full audiobook of your choice free at http://hotaudiobook.com/free Just start a 30-day Free Trial and pick any one audiobook free from 100,000+ best sellers, new releases sci-fi, romances, mysteries, classics, and more. Sign up, select your favorite audiobook, free, with a 30-day trial, stream or download your audiobook instantly on your smartphone, tablet, laptop or desktop. It's that easy!
 
This unit will enable you to understand how arguments are constructed and used in the Social Sciences. Using extracts from a Radio 4 broadcast you will look at the different viewpoints that are taken by the participants and analyse how the different arguments are being put together. This study unit is just one of many that can be found on LearningSpace, part of OpenLearn, a collection of open educational resources from The Open University. Published in ePub 2.0.1 format, some feature such as ...
 
This conference took place in the Royal Irish Academy on May 7 2013. The conference sought to strengthen the profile and advance the research agenda of the Humanities and qualitative Social Sciences within the framework of Horizon 2020. The central objective of this event was to give prominence to previously neglected aspects of the Humanities and Social Sciences as the means of identifying 'alternative competences' and demonstrating their central value with regard to cultural, social and ec ...
 
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Listen to this audiobook free with a 30-day trial. Go to http://hotaudiobook.com/free Title: Why Reese's Are Usually Taxed but Kit Kats Aren'tAuthor: Dan LewisNarrator: Giovannie CruzFormat: UnabridgedLength: 3 minsLanguage: EnglishRelease date: 09-26-16Publisher: Now I KnowGenres: Nonfiction, Social SciencesPublisher's Summary:If you live in an ar…
 
Listen to this audiobook free with a 30-day trial. Go to http://hotaudiobook.com/free Title: Parents, Aisle 15Author: Dan LewisNarrator: Giovannie CruzFormat: UnabridgedLength: 3 minsLanguage: EnglishRelease date: 11-10-16Publisher: Audible StudiosGenres: Nonfiction, Social SciencesPublisher's Summary:In 1985, a Michigan woman namedChristine Tallad…
 
Listen to this audiobook free with a 30-day trial. Go to http://hotaudiobook.com/free Title: The Land of the Adopted SonAuthor: Dan LewisNarrator: Giovannie CruzFormat: UnabridgedLength: 3 minsLanguage: EnglishRelease date: 11-10-16Publisher: Audible StudiosGenres: Nonfiction, Social SciencesPublisher's Summary:In 2011, a total of 81,000 people wer…
 
What helped you find hope this past year or two? Was it a person, a hobby, or something else? In the final episode of Season 4 we explore where individuals look to keep hope alive in their toughest times. With insights from our expert guest, Professor Lenore Manderson, we also consider areas where Australia has stripped some people of the right to …
 
If you have a few ‘buy now pay later’ purchases on the go, is that debt? And if it is, do you think of it as good debt or bad debt? With the introduction of options like Afterpay and its many competitors, this episode explores how debt has become a game that's easy to begin but nearly impossible to end, especially for Australia’s young people.…
 
Have you found it harder to motivate yourself these past two years? What incentives would have turned things around? We talk to two experts about incentives and learn that humans aren’t as rational as we’d like to think, making the business of incentives a tricky one indeed.Kirjoittanut Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia
 
Ever cut your own hair then speed dialled your hairdresser for a fix? Regretted a spot of DIY? If so, you’ll have a new respect for experts. But now that everyone has a platform, which voices can we trust to keep us informed? Or are we happier just listening to anyone willing to tell us what we want to hear? Australia’s Chief Scientist Dr Cathy Fol…
 
With Covid rates remaining stubbornly high and a huge pent-up demand for hospital care, the UK’s National Health Service faces a tough winter. Intensive care wards are the canary in the mine, reports Rachael Jolley. Mark Toshner: We can make beds, but what we can’t make are specialised staff to run those beds. The accident and emergency department …
 
Go on, admit it. When Prince Harry and Megan Markle left the UK – you took note. Ok, maybe YOU didn’t, but millions of others did. But why, in modern society, are monarchies so persistent? Guided by declared republican Professor Dennis Altman, we look at monarchies from a global perspective: the ones that work, the ones that don't, and the ones tha…
 
If you hooked up with your partner in recent years chances are, you met online. For those who spent their early years of dating ‘old school’, the shift to online dating came with some bias. But what is the impact of internet dating on human relationships? Hear from Emerita Professor Christine Beasley, author of Internet Dating: Intimacy and Social …
 
Can money right a wrong? How hard is it on victims going through the court system seeking money justice? In this episode, Turia Pitt talks frankly about why she pursued a financial settlement; Professor Kathleen Daly explains money justice and its roots; and lawyer Josh Bornstein gives an insider's perspective on the road he’s seen victims travel i…
 
Can you trust your memories? Ever wondered if your earliest recollections really happened the way you remember them? Professor Amanda Barnier helps us explore the strengths and challenges of memory: how it works and how others can help us to remember better. Plus, Professor Kate Darien-Smith helps uncover how historians shape memories on everyone’s…
 
Feeling old? Good news: you’re trending. Globally, there are now more people over the age of 65 than five and under. By 2050, there’ll be more over 65s than under 21s. But in Australia, where 1 in 10 Australian companies will not hire people over 50, ageism is rife. So what’s the cost of excluding older people, and what are some solutions to our ag…
 
How will you retire well? How much money will you need to maintain your standard of living once you’re not working, particularly in your last 20-30 years of life? With help from our guest Professor Andrew Podger from the Australian National University (ANU), you’ll learn when to throw money into superannuation (and when to supercharge your efforts)…
 
With travel bans and canned plans, negotiating travel in the time of COVID is proving tricky. We’ll talk to experts about where the industry is at now, learn what’s happened to those dependant on the industry for their career, and explain why tourism is so stuck negotiating the present it’s almost impossible for those in it to plan for the future.…
 
Whether or not your own business – or your own employment situation – was impacted directly, nobody could ignore seeing the financial impact of COVID-19 start to unfold last year. Podcast host Ginger Gorman reviews her 2020 interview with Economics Editor for the Sydney Morning Herald Ross Gittins, who stated that Australia's recession was “complet…
 
It’s not about individual countries. It’s not about individual regions. It’s not even about blocks. This doesn’t work unless we vaccinate everybody. But is geopolitics getting in the way of good public health policy as we strive to overcome COVID-19? In this podcast, Rachael Jolley, former editor-in-chief of Index on Censorship and research fellow …
 
What's involved in forecasting the Federal Budget, COVID-19 daily case numbers, or Australia's electricity needs? Join expert Professor Rob Hyndman as he explains the art of prediction. This episode also features guests Jehan Ratnatunga (Who Gives A Crap) and leading economist Stephen Koukoulas.Kirjoittanut Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia
 
Whatevs, just chillax – slang is here to stay. Slang expert Professor Kate Burridge explains how slang evolves and why it sticks around, and you’ll meet three linguists who are working hard to revitalise some of our ‘sleeping’ Indigenous languages.Kirjoittanut Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia
 
The death of writer and activist Nawal el Saadawi has just been announced. In 2011 Tess Woodcraft interviewed her at a conference organised by the Iranian and Kurdish Women’s Right Organisation for Pod Academy. We reproduce it here. Typically, and at 80 years old, she had stopped off at the Occupy encampment around St Paul’s Cathedral on her way fr…
 
Toxic masculinity and rape culture are in the headlines again. And women are furious. So how can we reset masculine norms? We met two men working to help others embrace an expression of masculinity that is healthy for all genders. We also look to the past to understand the present as Professor Pauline Grosjean explains how gender imbalance in the a…
 
Are you or your team clocking long hours at work? Or often twiddling your thumbs? Turns out Goldilocks was right: the balance needs to be just right. In this episode, Professor Andrew Neal discusses how bosses effectively (and ineffectively) manage workloads and what the risks are when they get it wrong.…
 
Journalism has sometimes been a dangerous profession during the pandemic, but there has been real innovation, too. In this, the third part of our series on Journalism in the Pandemic, Rachael Jolley, former editor-in-chief of Index on Censorship and research fellow at the Centre for Freedom of the Media at the University of Sheffield considers how …
 
Have you ever used humour in a potentially inappropriate situation? Did it help? Humour does more than provide a giggle or two. It's an energiser, an icebreaker and a team builder. In this episode, Professor Sharyn Roach Anleu, Dr David Cheng and the 2020 cartoonist of the year Cathy Wilcox explain its purpose and provide some laughs along the way …
 
Authoritarian restrictions on the press, attacks on journalists in the streets and more accusations of ‘fake news’ – it’s like a war zone out there. Rachael Jolley looks at the dangers of reporting during the Covid -19 pandemic. Jolley (@londoninsider) has developed a series of podcasts for Pod Academy on News in the Pandemic, this is the second in…
 
Do you have an image you just can't get out of your mind? Something from the news or a current event? Did it impact how you thought about that issue - maybe for decades? According to Professor Roland Bleiker (and at least one Ethiopian taxi driver) visual politics is a real thing, and it's twisting our perceptions every day.…
 
Local newspapers have been in decline for years, but the decline has been massively exacerbated by the Covid pandemic. Can a new type of hyper-local journalism be the answer for local news and local democracy? And how will it be funded? Rachael Jolley (@londoninsider), research fellow @sheffjournalism and former Editor-in-Chief of Index on Censorsh…
 
The TV show, Neighbours, premiered in 1985. Since then, you’re likely to know half as many neighbours as you did in the mid-1980s. So, how did your community help you get through 2020? And why is something Professor Andrew Leigh terms “an ugly term for a beautiful concept” (social capital) so important?…
 
Do you have a family recipe that keeps you together? Most of us have at least one dish in our repertoire that holds decades of memories - or even family history. Did you revisit that recipe this year? One of Australia’s eminent food historians shares how food keeps us together, even when we are apart – both in good times and times of crisis, and wh…
 
How much would you pay to claw back some extra time? Would the answer be different now that, as one of the few silver linings of COVID 19, you can work from home a lot more? Would it be $10 a week? $20 a week? Transport expert Professor David Hensher actually knows the answer. (Spoiler: It’s a lot!) The death of commuting is making many of us happi…
 
How far would you go to right a wrong? Would you crowdfund your way to the High Court? That’s exactly what Professor Jenny Hocking did when she realised Australians were being kept from accessing the real history behind the historic 1975 Whitlam government dismissal. We take you behind the scenes to the treasure hunt for those 200 explosive Palace …
 
Ross Gittins, Economics Editor for the Sydney Morning Herald, has seen both sides of three recessions. This one is the fourth he’s worked through. So why is this one “completely different” and why does this experienced commentator say it will it be harder to get out of? Listen in as Ross and host Ginger Gorman discuss the ins and outs of our strugg…
 
As protests and riots continue in America over police brutality and persecution of people of colour, Australia’s own injustices against Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people must also be subject to public scrutiny. Join Aboriginal Australian activist and human rights lawyer, Megan Davis, alongside host Ginger Gorman as they reflect on the si…
 
Pyjamas, commuting from bed to your desk just minutes after waking up, no boss looking over your shoulde­r–working from home sounds like a dream. But what about the pressures from family, bad technology, and lack of support from colleagues? Professor Sharon Parker, from the Future of Work Institute at Curtin University, and Laureate from the Austra…
 
Male socialisation and ideals of masculinity already have a devastating effect on the health and well-being of men across the globe. With the added pressures from COVID-19, and forced isolation, this issue is turning into another kind of pandemic. Join Professor Jane Pirkis, Director of the Centre for Mental Health at the University of Melbourne sp…
 
Australian higher education institutions are caught up in the fallout caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. But closing borders to international students has had an unintended outcome: it’s highlighted faults in the system and raised new questions around higher education in Australian society. How can we best support our international students? Should h…
 
When is a health crisis not just a health crisis? When it’s a global pandemic and it shows up the weak points that already existed in society. But could COVID19, for all its problems, be part of a much-needed reset for Australia’s health and other systems? Former Australian of the Year, Professor Fiona Stanley explores the opportunity to build a be…
 
Why do CEOs get paid so much? Why are we so discriminatory about mental illness? And where would the Federal Government’s dollars be best spent in our efforts to reset the economy? Economist, lawyer and former chair of the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission, Professor Allan Fels AO has spent much of his career fighting for the battler. …
 
As Australia reels from the catastrophic bushfires and deals with COVID-19, these moments have revealed the fragility of our infrastructure including supply chains and telecommunications. This episode of the Seriously Social podcast explores Artificial Intelligence and what it means for humanity. Join host Ginger Gorman with cultural anthropologist…
 
Seriously Social helps you understand your world. Each week listen to indepth, intelligent insights from Australia’s best social scientists. We talk human society, our social relationships and the world in transition. Hosted by journalist Ginger Gorman and brought to you by the Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia.…
 
Pre-pandemic Australia was seen as an epicentre of hope – that despite high rates of loneliness and suicidality, we were getting buy-in on the important work to be done in mental health. Mental illness is costing Australia thousands of lives each year, as well as counting for 35% loss of GDP from health problems. So why, despite the daily reminder …
 
How do you build the mental wealth of a nation? Mental ill health is costing us about 4% of GDP, a figure that one of Australia’s best-known researchers in the field, Professor Ian Hickie says holds its own meaning:“It clearly points a chaotic system, that’s poorly funded and was never designed to deliver mental health for those who are in trouble …
 
How is the domestic load shared in your household? Would you say it’s more or less equal, or, as in so many Aussie households, is the division of domestic labour and childcare a battleground? The pandemic created what experts describe as an unprecedented external shock, forcing homes to temporarily become our primary workplaces as well as the locat…
 
Have you been using your phone and your computer more in pandemic? The paradox is that tech can make us more connected, but also more isolated. But are there circumstances in which tech actually brings us closer together? What lessons can we learn from this crisis as humans? What will this teach us about community, compassion and kindness? This wee…
 
The Covid-19 pandemic transformed Australian society and the world seemingly overnight. But suddenly politics looks very different too. The virus effectively wiped the political slate and took all kinds of pressing issues off the agenda. At the same, time major Government messages displayed a kind of bipartisanship perhaps reserved only for times o…
 
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