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The huge Amazon Alexa hit Word of the Day is now available as a podcast! Word of the Day teaches you a useful word, its definition, etymology, and gives you examples of how to use it in a sentence. A new word each and every day! Perfect for those looking to expand their vocabulary, learning English and looking for a boost and anyone who loves words.
 
Culinary Word of the Day is hosted by chef and author Jenn de la Vega. Subscribe to short, educational weekly dispatches to expand your vocabulary of the comestible across agriculture, technology, cooking techniques, food trends, and international cuisine. Esculentè is a behind-the-scenes conversation podcast hosted by Jenn de la Vega and research producer Alicia Book. For every three culinary words, Jenn and Alicia discuss material from the cutting room floor in a series of bonus episodes. ...
 
Welcome to Tony Sam's Word of the Day Podcast! You may think you know what words mean, but YOU DON'T! Lucky for you, Tony Sam DOES. Tony Sam graduated magna cum laude from the Harvard School of Law and has been fascinated with the evolution of the English language as far back as he can remember. Currently serving as a Judge in the 23rd Circuit Court of Illinois, he finds time to learn more about words whenever he’s not walking his prized Labrador, Marshall. His other accolades include gradua ...
 
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Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for November 27, 2022 is: onomatopoeia • \ah-nuh-mah-tuh-PEE-uh\ • noun Onomatopoeia means “the creation or use of words that imitate sounds.” It can also refer to the words themselves. // The poem “Cynthia in the Snow” by Gwendolyn Brooks is famous for its beautiful onomatopoeia, capturing in vivid language snow’s…
 
Check out Kira’s video library at https://vimeo.com/ondemand/russiansoundswithkira/ and if you’re NOT already a Patreon subscriber, sign up for 52 weeks of Russian phonemes with Kira at https://www.patreon.com/learnrussianwithkira/ – and someone go tell Reddit for me! Счастливо! 🌷☀️🦋🌱💫Kirjoittanut Kimberly (Kira) DiMattia
 
Juvenescence is a noun that refers to the state or period of being young. The latin word juvenis (YOU ven ees) which means ‘young’ is the basis for the word juvenile as well as the basis for our word of the day which entered the English language in the early 19th century. If I had been more determined to prepare for the future, I would have spent m…
 
Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for November 26, 2022 is: sustain • \suh-STAYN\ • verb Sustain means "to provide what is needed for something or someone to exist or continue; to nourish." It can also mean "to hold up the weight of," "to suffer or endure," or "to confirm or prove." In legal contexts, to sustain something is to decide or state that…
 
Check out Kira’s video library at https://vimeo.com/ondemand/russiansoundswithkira/ and if you’re NOT already a Patreon subscriber, sign up for 52 weeks of Russian phonemes with Kira at https://www.patreon.com/learnrussianwithkira/ – and someone go tell Reddit for me! Счастливо! 🌷☀️🦋🌱💫Kirjoittanut Kimberly (Kira) DiMattia
 
Ostentatious is an adjective that means characterized by vulgar or pretentious display. Our word of the day comes from the Latin word ostentare (OS ten TAR ay) which means ‘to show or display.’ Entering English in the mid 15th century, our word of the day is often used to describe the tendency to show or display one’s wealth a little too much. For …
 
Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for November 25, 2022 is: jejune • \jih-JOON\ • adjective Jejune is a formal word often used as a synonym of juvenile to describe things (such as behaviors, attitudes, etc.) that are immature, childish, or simplistic. It can also mean "uninteresting" or "boring." // Her rude and jejune remarks about the painting we…
 
Check out Kira’s video library at https://vimeo.com/ondemand/russiansoundswithkira/ and if you’re NOT already a Patreon subscriber, sign up for 52 weeks of Russian phonemes with Kira at https://www.patreon.com/learnrussianwithkira/ – and someone go tell Reddit for me! Счастливо! 🌷☀️🦋🌱💫Kirjoittanut Kimberly (Kira) DiMattia
 
Rapturous is an adjective that means expressing or feeling great pleasure. Our word of the day is derived from the Latin word raptus (ROP toos) which means ‘to seize.’ From this word, rapture entered the English language in the late 16th century. Rapturous is the adjective version. Here’s an example of it in use. The first ten minutes of the movie …
 
Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for November 24, 2022 is: cornucopia • \kor-nuh-KOH-pee-uh\ • noun A cornucopia, also known as a horn of plenty, is a curved, hollow goat’s horn or similarly shaped receptacle (such as a horn-shaped basket) that is overflowing, especially with fruit and vegetables. The image of a cornucopia is commonly used as deco…
 
Check out Kira’s video library at https://vimeo.com/ondemand/russiansoundswithkira/ and if you’re NOT already a Patreon subscriber, sign up for 52 weeks of Russian phonemes with Kira at https://www.patreon.com/learnrussianwithkira/ – and someone go tell Reddit for me! Счастливо! 🌷☀️🦋🌱💫Kirjoittanut Kimberly (Kira) DiMattia
 
Valedictory is an adjective that means serving as a farewell. The Latin phrase vale dicere (VAL ay dee CHAIR ay) means ‘to say goodbye,’ and it provides the origin or our word of the day. Valedictory is often used in a formal setting. Here’s an example. It was a touching moment to watch the king offer a heartfelt valedictory to his subjects. Saying…
 
Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for November 23, 2022 is: vamoose • \vuh-MOOSS\ • verb Vamoose is an informal word that means "to depart quickly." // With the sheriff and his posse hot on their tails, the bank robbers knew they had better vamoose. See the entry > Examples: "[Ali S.] Khan's group packed fast and vamoosed on a small airplane, which…
 
Check out Kira’s video library at https://vimeo.com/ondemand/russiansoundswithkira/ and if you’re NOT already a Patreon subscriber, sign up for 52 weeks of Russian phonemes with Kira at https://www.patreon.com/learnrussianwithkira/ – and someone go tell Reddit for me! Счастливо! 🌷☀️🦋🌱💫Kirjoittanut Kimberly (Kira) DiMattia
 
Cozen is a verb that means to trick or deceive. The Latin word cocio (COE see oh) means ‘dealer,’ but after a trip through the Italian language, the word evolved into a verb cozzonare (coe zone ARE ay) meaning ‘to cheat.’ By the late 16th century it landed in English as our word of the day. Here’s an example of cozen in use: Sorry I didn’t reply to…
 
Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for November 22, 2022 is: leonine • \LEE-uh-nyne\ • adjective Leonine means “of, relating to, or resembling a lion.” // She spent hours in the bathroom trying to detangle her leonine tresses. See the entry > Examples: “As I tried harder and harder ... I began to understand more about what [Fabio] meant at the time,…
 
Check out Kira’s video library at https://vimeo.com/ondemand/russiansoundswithkira/ and if you’re NOT already a Patreon subscriber, sign up for 52 weeks of Russian phonemes with Kira at https://www.patreon.com/learnrussianwithkira/ – and someone go tell Reddit for me! Счастливо! 🌷☀️🦋🌱💫Kirjoittanut Kimberly (Kira) DiMattia
 
Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for November 21, 2022 is: temerity • \tuh-MAIR-uh-tee\ • noun Temerity is a formal word that means "unreasonable or foolhardy contempt of danger or opposition"; it is a synonym of both rashness and recklessness. Temerity can also refer to a rash or reckless act. // The line between boldness and temerity is sometime…
 
Check out Kira’s video library at https://vimeo.com/ondemand/russiansoundswithkira/ and if you’re NOT already a Patreon subscriber, sign up for 52 weeks of Russian phonemes with Kira at https://www.patreon.com/learnrussianwithkira/ – and someone go tell Reddit for me! Счастливо! 🌷☀️🦋🌱💫Kirjoittanut Kimberly (Kira) DiMattia
 
Speechify is a verb that means to deliver a speech in a tedious or pompous way. By strict definition, our word of the day simply means ‘to make a speech,’ but when used colloquially, it makes to speak in arrogant, self-aggrandizing ways. Speechify’s origin is in the German word sprache (SPRAH huh). The dinner went well until the governor felt he ne…
 
Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for November 20, 2022 is: extirpate • \EK-ster-payt\ • verb Extirpate means “to destroy completely,” and is often—though not exclusively—used in reference to plant and animal populations. It can also be used to mean “to pull up by the root” and “to cut out by surgery.” // Despite the years-long effort to extirpate …
 
Check out Kira’s video library at https://vimeo.com/ondemand/russiansoundswithkira/ and if you’re NOT already a Patreon subscriber, sign up for 52 weeks of Russian phonemes with Kira at https://www.patreon.com/learnrussianwithkira/ – and someone go tell Reddit for me! Счастливо! 🌷☀️🦋🌱💫Kirjoittanut Kimberly (Kira) DiMattia
 
Glamping is a noun that refers to the act of camping with luxurious accommodations. Our word of the day was born in the early 21st century and combines two familiar English words, glamor and camping. I had a feeling that Ana’s idea of ‘roughing it’ was really just a form of glamping. It’s not surprising that someone so preoccupied with glamor would…
 
Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for November 19, 2022 is: pell-mell • \pel-MEL\ • adverb Pell-mell means “in a confused and hurried way” or “in mingled confusion or disorder.” // On Black Friday, some shoppers rush pell-mell into stores to find their favorite items at a discounted price. See the entry> Examples: “But, before we head pell-mell dow…
 
Check out Kira’s video library at https://vimeo.com/ondemand/russiansoundswithkira/ and if you’re NOT already a Patreon subscriber, sign up for 52 weeks of Russian phonemes with Kira at https://www.patreon.com/learnrussianwithkira/ – and someone go tell Reddit for me! Счастливо! 🌷☀️🦋🌱💫Kirjoittanut Kimberly (Kira) DiMattia
 
Immiserate is a verb that means to cause to become poor or impoverished. The word ‘miser’ today refers to someone who hoards money, but its Latin roots are in a word that means ‘wretched.’ This is where words like misery and miserable come from. It’s also the source of our word of the day. To immiserate someone is to make them miserable or unhappy,…
 
Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for November 18, 2022 is: farce • \FAHRSS\ • noun A farce is a ridiculous act, proceeding, or situation. Farce can also refer to a light dramatic work marked by satirical comedy and improbable plot, or the broad humor characteristic of such. The word can also refer to a savory stuffing. // "The company's guarantee …
 
Check out Kira’s video library at https://vimeo.com/ondemand/russiansoundswithkira/ and if you’re NOT already a Patreon subscriber, sign up for 52 weeks of Russian phonemes with Kira at https://www.patreon.com/learnrussianwithkira/ – and someone go tell Reddit for me! Счастливо! 🌷☀️🦋🌱💫Kirjoittanut Kimberly (Kira) DiMattia
 
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