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Named after Charles Babbage, a 19th-century polymath and grandfather of computing, Babbage is a weekly podcast on science and technology. Host Alok Jha talks to our correspondents about the innovations, discoveries and gadgetry making the news. Published every Tuesday by Economist Podcasts. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
 
Checks and Balance unlocks American politics by taking a big theme each week and digging into the data, the ideas, and the history shaping the country. Join John Prideaux, Charlotte Howard, Idrees Kahloon and Jon Fasman as they talk to politicians, pollsters, academics and people across the country about the great experiment of American democracy. For more from Checks and Balance, sign up at https://www.economist.com/newsletters/checks-and-balance to receive our weekly newsletter. Hosted on ...
 
The World in Brief from The Economist tells you what’s on the global agenda in the coming day, what to look out for in business, finance and politics and, most importantly, what to make of it. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions, including the full World in Brief, three times each day: https://www.economist.com/briefingoffer. Digital subscribers to The Economist should log in at https://www.economist.com/the-world-in-brief for access to the ...
 
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The Grower & The Economist

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The Grower & The Economist

Peter Konjoian & Michelle Klieger

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Peter Konjoian (Grower) & Michelle Klieger (Economist) share expert insights to help small and medium-sized growers adjust to the rapidly changing farm and food landscape as well as increase the productivity and profitability of their operation. We are one part grower and one part business just like your business. Edited by Katelyn Parsons
 
The Economist unlocks the science, data and politics behind the most ambitious inoculation programme the world has ever seen. Alok Jha, The Economist’s science correspondent, hosts with Natasha Loder, our health-policy editor. Each week our reporters and data journalists join them in conversation, along with scientists around the world. They inject the perfect dose of insight and analysis into the global effort to escape the pandemic. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
 
We deliver vital business intelligence to executives the world over. With access to over 650 expert analysts and editors across 200 countries worldwide, underpinned by an unrivalled in-house survey panel that bolsters the qualitative and quantitative analysis, we uncover novel and forward-looking perspectives.
 
The EIU Digital Economy podcast is a monthly series examining the technologies, ideas and people driving the digitisation of the global economy. Sponsored by DXC, the podcast aims to help business leaders understand the way in which digital technology affects their companies, their teams, and their careers. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
 
The Black Economists Network (TBEN) is a UK-based organisation that seeks to connect, support, and inspire Black economists, whilst challenging the lack of diversity in the field. Through our podcast we aim to educate our audience through discussions on various economic topics as well as equip them with insights into the economics profession.
 
Since the late 19th century, politics and economics have been split from each other, pretended and positioned as separate and unassuming forces. This could not be further from the truth. Before the dawn of Adam Smith, the grandfather of modern day economics, there was but one holistic concept, the Political Economy. Come join Max and Jorrel, modern day Political Economists, as they do their best to converse and discuss political theory, history, economics, and more in the lenses of contempor ...
 
Do you consider economics to be boring and overly complex? This podcast will change your mind. Tune in to grasp complex economic theory, problems and events in a digestible way so you can keep informed and empower yourself with the tools to engage in intellectual debate. If you're looking to boost your general knowledge of world-wide economic events and understand how changes in markets and government policies affect your well-being, this is the place to start. Follow and contact me on Insta ...
 
For over 60 years CEDA has debated and discussed critical issues through our research and events platform – now we bring the conversation right to you with our Podcasts. Hear directly from some of the best and brightest policy minds in Australia and around the world, alongside our CEO Melinda Cilento and Chief Economist Jarrod Ball, as we explore the issues and pursue solutions that deliver better economic and social outcomes for the greater good.
 
The Digital Economist Speaker Series drives radical collaboration between global action leaders on the most urgent topics and challenges we face today: climate, health, society, economics. With the global population facing multiple man-made crises that threaten our existence and the wellbeing of the planet, using science and technology to serve human needs is no longer a choice – it's a necessity.
 
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show series
 
America’s Congress may be gridlocked, but its state legislatures certainly aren’t. The laws they’ll pass this year will probably impact more people more directly than anything Congress does, with just a fraction of the public attention. Why things are looking up for Meta. And reflecting on the legacy and achievements of Pervez Musharraf, Pakistan’s…
 
Engineers have spent decades trying to create functional humanoid robots, which look and act like humans. But these machines, which combine complex mechanics with generative artificial intelligence models, like ChatGPT, are finally coming-of-age. Are they good enough to sustain a human-like conversation, though? Host Alok Jha travels to Cornwall to…
 
Government employees work in a monopoly where the fallen nature is encouraged. Private employees work in competitive environments which discourage self-interest. What happened to the term “civil servant?” Honestly, I have not heard that term used in twenty years. The idea was that workers who earned their living in the public sector were serving……
 
A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, President Joe Biden’s plan to remake America’s economy, Ukraine’s troops in the east are quietly confident (11:20) and the race of the AI labs heats up (18:10). Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:…
 
More and more universities across America now require would-be professors to submit so-called diversity statements. These ask applicants to set out their commitment to, and experience of, promoting diversity, equity and inclusion. At the same time some Republican-led states, most notably Florida, are putting their own restrictions on academia. How …
 
Goldman once dominated Wall Street. In 2009, after the financial crisis, when most financial institutions were left reeling, Goldman had its best year ever. It appeared an apex-predator, one that could outsmart its rivals in even the toughest environments. But the last decade has been humbling for Goldman. On this week’s podcast, hosts Alice Fulwoo…
 
Decades ago, cabbage demand was off the charts and Dr. Konjoian listened to his father not to grow cabbage the following season. Dive into the technical terms and more examples of leading indicators in the agriculture business. We have talked about fuel prices and labor, but how can farmers adapt to local consumer behaviors and national fashion tre…
 
We turn the spotlight on forecasting itself, and look back on the predictions we made for 2022. How accurate were we? How do “superforecasters” look into the future? And how can forecasters account for irrational world leaders when predicting major events? Charlotte Howard, The Economist’s executive editor, talks to Tom Standage, editor of The Worl…
 
America’s Congress may be gridlocked, but its state legislatures certainly aren’t. The laws they’ll pass this year will probably impact more people more directly than anything Congress does, with just a fraction of the public attention. Why things are looking up for Meta. And reflecting on the legacy and achievements of Pervez Musharraf, Pakistan’s…
 
Engineers have spent decades trying to create functional humanoid robots, which look and act like humans. But these machines, which combine complex mechanics with generative artificial intelligence models, like ChatGPT, are finally coming-of-age. Are they good enough to sustain a human-like conversation, though? Host Alok Jha travels to Cornwall to…
 
The race for AI supremacy is on. Microsoft, Google, Baidu and a host of smaller firms are all placing bets on the technology’s future. Which version emerges on top may well determine how people find information online for decades to come. Luxury offices are a bright spot in the commercial real-estate doldrums. And why inflation is stalking Europe’s…
 
The race for AI supremacy is on. Microsoft, Google, Baidu and a host of smaller firms are all placing bets on the technology’s future. Which version emerges on top may well determine how people find information online for decades to come. Luxury offices are a bright spot in the commercial real-estate doldrums. And why inflation is stalking Europe’s…
 
It’s been a year since Xi Jinping and Vladimir Putin announced the “no-limits” friendship between China and Russia, but is it one between equals? In the second episode of a two-part series, The Economist’s Beijing bureau chief, David Rennie, and our senior China correspondent, Alice Su, explore the rocky past of Sino-Soviet relations with historian…
 
Amid unthinkable destruction and loss of life, we examine the factors that will frustrate relief efforts following earthquakes in an already troubled region. As President Joe Biden prepares to welcome a new chief of staff, we speak with the author who literally wrote the book on America’s second-most-powerful government job. And Argentina’s newest …
 
Amid unthinkable destruction and loss of life, we examine the factors that will frustrate relief efforts following earthquakes in an already troubled region. As President Joe Biden prepares to welcome a new chief of staff, we speak with the author who literally wrote the book on America’s second-most-powerful government job. And Argentina’s newest …
 
A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, President Joe Biden’s plan to remake America’s economy, Ukraine’s troops in the east are quietly confident (11:20) and the race of the AI labs heats up (18:10). Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:…
 
American fighters shot down a balloon that China says was monitoring the weather, but America insists was spying. It was a minor incident, but it highlights the relationship of a great-power rivalry with inadequate guardrails. Our correspondent visits a market in Mumbai to see what might be lost as India’s economy formalises. And some surprising—an…
 
American fighters shot down a balloon that China says was monitoring the weather, but America insists was spying. It was a minor incident, but it highlights the relationship of a great-power rivalry with inadequate guardrails. Our correspondent visits a market in Mumbai to see what might be lost as India’s economy formalises. And some surprising—an…
 
More and more universities across America now require would-be professors to submit so-called diversity statements. These ask applicants to set out their commitment to, and experience of, promoting diversity, equity and inclusion. At the same time some Republican-led states, most notably Florida, are putting their own restrictions on academia. How …
 
As part of The Economist’s new series on the remaking of the country's economy, our correspondent looks at the Biden administration’s audacious industrial plans. Russia’s media outlets have been relentlessly squeezed, so many have set up newsrooms in exile; we examine the rise of “offshore journalism”. And reflecting on the life of Gina Lollobrigid…
 
As part of The Economist’s new series on the remaking of the country's economy, our correspondent looks at the Biden administration’s audacious industrial plans. Russia’s media outlets have been relentlessly squeezed, so many have set up newsrooms in exile; we examine the rise of “offshore journalism”. And reflecting on the life of Gina Lollobrigid…
 
Goldman once dominated Wall Street. In 2009, after the financial crisis, when most financial institutions were left reeling, Goldman had its best year ever. It appeared an apex-predator, one that could outsmart its rivals in even the toughest environments. But the last decade has been humbling for Goldman. On this week’s podcast, hosts Alice Fulwoo…
 
The country remains riven by unrest since the “self-coup” and subsequent arrest of its president in December; only an early election might bring a return to calm. Our correspondent goes shopping to discover the spending habits of Generation Z and millennials. And examining the work of Tom Lehrer, a mathematician who was an unlikely midwife at the b…
 
The country remains riven by unrest since the “self-coup” and subsequent arrest of its president in December; only an early election might bring a return to calm. Our correspondent goes shopping to discover the spending habits of Generation Z and millennials. And examining the work of Tom Lehrer, a mathematician who was an unlikely midwife at the b…
 
Alcohol is the most widely used drug in the world, but it is also the cause of three million deaths each year and has been linked to many other long-term illnesses. In addition, the loss of productivity due to hangovers has an outsized impact on some economies. People still want to have a good time, though, and innovators are dreaming up ways to en…
 
Alcohol is the most widely used drug in the world, but it is also the cause of three million deaths each year and has been linked to many other long-term illnesses. In addition, the loss of productivity due to hangovers has an outsized impact on some economies. People still want to have a good time, though, and innovators are dreaming up ways to en…
 
Recent pay increases for the poor have out-paced inflation, which is more support for the idea that the market will take care of the poor, if we just let it operate freely. The Democrat party has given up on caring for the poor via minimum wage, and the market has taken over that role. An…Kirjoittanut Dave Arnott
 
The Adani Group, one of India’s biggest conglomerates, has come under fire from a tiny American research firm. A successful secondary share sale amid a rout in the markets leaves many questions—and proves revealing about India Inc. Our correspondent explains why Mexico is so well-placed to navigate the electric-vehicle transition. And the unlikely …
 
The Adani Group, one of India’s biggest conglomerates, has come under fire from a tiny American research firm. A successful secondary share sale amid a rout in the markets leaves many questions—and proves revealing about India Inc. Our correspondent explains why Mexico is so well-placed to navigate the electric-vehicle transition. And the unlikely …
 
It’s been a year since Xi Jinping and Vladimir Putin announced the “no-limits” friendship between China and Russia. What drives the relationship and which side benefits from it more? In the first episode of a two-part series, The Economist’s Beijing bureau chief, David Rennie, and senior China correspondent, Alice Su, assess how the relationship be…
 
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